The neglected “Qubbat Dûris”

The neglected “Qubbat Dûris”

Qubbat Dûris was built in 1243 during the Ayyubid era. Its eight columns were probably borrowed from the ruins of the nearby Baalbeck Complex and were randomly assembled, one being upside-down. A dome used to exist atop these columns.

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Beirut Port over the years

Beirut Port over the years

Beirut Port was mentioned for the first time in mutual letters between the Pharaohs and the Phoenicians around 1500 BC. During the Roman Era (64 BC–636 AD), the port was developed into a commercial and economic center. During the Umayyad Era (661–750), it hosted the First Arabic fleet. The port gained an important role in the maritime trade between East and West during the rule of the Crusaders (1099-1291). This role became even stronger during the Mameluke Era (1291–1515) when the port was turned into a commercial center for the whole region. The port as we know it was founded by the end of the 19th century and has always been a crucial part of Lebanese development and politics.

I went over thousands of old photos, postcards, paintings and lithographs of Lebanon and came out with this timeline (from 1838 till today).

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A journey through Lebanon in 1851

A journey through Lebanon in 1851

Long before the declaration of Greater Lebanon, Dutch lieutenant and painter “Charles William Meredith Van de Velde” visited the Levant and wrote his amazing book “Narrative of a journey through Syria and Palestine in 1851 and 1852“. Along with this book, he made 100 lithographs of the main cities, monuments and places that he visited.

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The abandoned stones of Baalbeck

The abandoned stones of Baalbeck

Most of you have visited the city of Baalbeck but probably haven’t seen these 2000-year-old Roman monoliths.

The Stone of the Pregnant Woman, together with other nearby stone blocks, are among the largest monoliths ever quarried. The building blocks were presumably intended for Jupiter temple but they never made it out of the quarry.

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